4 Reasons *Not* to Create a Capsule Wardrobe

Audrey Hepburn Style Capsule Wardrobe

When we look back on 2016 in years to come, I think one of the things we’ll remember it for (in strictly fashion-related terms, obviously), is being the year of the capsule wardrobe.

Capsule wardrobes are everywhere right now, aren’t they? I feel like I can’t log onto Pinterest without seeing another capsule wardrobe graphic, and trust me when I say, I’m definitely not complaining about that: while I haven’t fully embraced the capsule wardrobe philosophy (I like shopping way too much for that!), it does hold a lot of appeal for me, and I’ve been pretty fascinated by it. I wrote a post earlier this year about why I’m obsessed with capsule wardrobes, but the fact is, this method of dressing/shopping definitely isn’t for everyone: so here are a few reasons you SHOULDN’T try to create a capsule wardrobe…

01. YOU DON’T REALLY KNOW WHAT YOUR STYLE IS

As I said in previous post, if you’re still trying to identify your style, a capsule wardrobe can be a good way to help you with that process. It could also really hinder you, though, because in order to create a capsule wardrobe, you have to first of all settle on the type of clothes you want to include in it (obviously), and restricting yourself to just those items will mean you’re no longer experimenting – so you might never work out what your true style is.

02. YOU KNOW WHAT YOU LIKE – BUT IT CHANGES ALL THE TIME

Some women find it really freeing to not have to think too much about what they’re going to wear every day. Other women, however, take a lot of pleasure in putting together outfits, and changing their look too suit their mood. If you’re one of those chameleon dressers, a capsule will just feel really restrictive to you – and why stop yourself doing something you enjoy?

03. YOUR WARDROBE CONSISTS MOSTLY OF STATEMENT PIECES

For a capsule wardrobe to really work, everything has to work with everything (or almost everything) else: which is why most capsules consist of classic, fairly basic pieces, which will easily mix and match. There’s not much place, then, for those statement shoes that only really work with one other item, or that fabulous printed skirt, which is a little tricky to style. Some statement pieces are also versatile, obviously, but if your wardrobe is full of the type of clothes that don’t play well with others, a capsule wardrobe might not be for you.

04. YOU MOSTLY WEAR DRESSES

My first couple of attempts at a capsule wardrobe failed dismally, because I’m a big fan of dresses, and wanted to include some of my favourites, which I felt sure I’d wear all the time. The problem with that, however, is that dresses are almost an outfit in themselves: sure, you can change your shoes and accessories, and you can add cardigans and outerwear to make them look a little bit different, but you’ll still end up with what is essentially the same look (and if it gets warm, and you decide to remove that jacket/cardigan/sweater, you’re left with EXACTLY the same look). Even I get bored with wearing the same dress, in the same way, over and over again, and once I’ve maxed out the limited opportunities a capsule wardrobe provides to change the look, I find I start missing all of my other dresses, and wishing I’d included more of them. I’m sure there are people out there who can make a dress-based capsule work really well, but I’m not one of them, and if you’re not either, again, this might not be for you!

With all of this said, I’ve personally found shifting my shopping focus from buying things purely because I see them and like them, to spending more time thinking about what I actually NEED and will wear, has helped me save money, shop less AND feel happier with my wardrobe. So if you’re keen to give it a try, then there’s no reason not to – you never know, you might just love it!

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